SXSW Day 6 | March 17 2017

SXSW Day 6 | March 17 2017

Last day of the Conference. I’m going to do a wrap up post about my thoughts and advice on a SXSW First Timer, but today was a fantastic ending to the most inspirational trip of my life.

The interactive sessions finished yesterday  so today was a little indulgence before the long haul back to Auckland.

I met a Leigh and Peter for breakfast at this very authentic Mexican Diner for some very good Huevos Rancheros (Mexican Eggs) and then headed off to the Convention Centre to listen to the Music Keynote by Zane Lowe.

Again, the theme was very much about perseverance and passion and having a real clear goal of what you want to do, then have a laser approach to fulfilling that goal. My favourite statement from his speech was one that our network should really heed to:

“Collaborate. Don’t Dominate”

Some great anecdotes and interspersed with some great music but was slightly disappointed that he was reading off an auto cue. Just hope he’d written his speech!

 

After Zane we went straight into a session with DMC from Run DMC. What an amazing and again inspirational session.

rundmc_2

He told his story of a young Catholic boy growing in New York and how he went from a shy comic loving introvert to one of the biggest hi-hop stars in the world. But for me the most fascinating bit was how this wasn’t really him, and being DMC actually made him incredibly depressed and unhappy and it wasn’t until he found therapy that he realized that he didn’t to get back to what made him happy as a kid, so he started writing comic books and focused on all the things that made him a happy kid. I think everyone can take something quite profound from this. The highlight of this talk was when DMC would just roll out rhymes. It was so cool!

My final session at SXSW was listening to iProspect’s global President Ruth Stubbs who was speaking about how Dentsu in SEA was helping female entrepreneurs become successful. Really fascinating and interesting stuff. I’ll share more when I get back.

And that’s all folks. After a little final wander around the town with Paul Pritchard, the only Kiwi left we caught a movie and started thinking about the 17 hour trip back to the land of the long white cloud…

Next blog entry will be my wrap up, but that’s going to take some time…

 

 

 

 

 

 

SXSW Day 5 | March 14 2017

SXSW Day 5 | March 14 2017

First stop this morning was for a brunch session at the You Tube corner. After a very needed cup of coffee I had a play with the new Google Daydream VR headset. WOW! After playing around with the Facebook VR I wasn’t really expecting much, but this was incredible. With a ting little touch remote you could move between videos easily. I had a play with an education app that was just mind blowing. Situated in the Natural History museum and focused on dinosaurs which come to life at a touch of a button. They looked so real, and so engaging I loved it.

There was also a short talk before I sat down with one of the US You Tube leads for a chat about how You Tube used properly can change lives, and push for social change. It was a facinating talk that centred aroun the work the Ad Council has done, that included these two videos that I urge you to watch…

And this one…

The main take out here was once again one of authenticity.

After a great chat with the VP of You Tube US which was fascinating and insightful especially about some of the new initiates coming to market over the next 12 months. That’s all I can say! Sorry 🙂

He also told me to go check out the Levis’ Outpost which included Google technology called Jacquard that was one of the coolest things I’ve seen for a long time. Briefly it is technology that actually weaves textiles with interactivity creating smart clothing. I could explain more but just watch the video below. I tried one on and it was so cool. You could literally double click your jacket and your music would start, or brush forward and the next track would start. On sale in a few weeks for US$350. I want one!

Two more sessions today. Both fascinating. The first was a really insightful look at influencer marketing. The key takeout here was as a brand you need to understand the difference between paying someone for their influence and paying someone for their craft. They suggest that brands need to reduce what they are spending in what they call “pay as you go influencers” and focus more on building long term relationships with celebrities and influencers that really are passionate about your brand. True influence is symbiotic – both parties need to transparent about their objectives and have a clear path to a trusted partnership. Here it is again: an authentic long term relationship.

The second took place after a rewarding lunch with Dentsu APAC Chief Digital Officer, Adam Good. The session was a quick but incredible look into the world of mixed reality, which is a term that I really like. Ultimately a combination of virtual and augmented reality that allows you to play or work in the physical and virtual worlds. The technologies at play here are just mind blowing:

  • Spatial Mapping
  • Holographic Overlay
  • Positional Sensing
  • Gesture Recognition

The best example of mixed reality right now is the Microsoft Hololens. Watch the video below!  Two words; wearable holograms!

 

The practical applications of this technology are just insane, more on this when I get back, and this really is the future. The guy talking who is a global expert in mixed reality reckons a holo-contact-lens is only five or so years away. Mad!

After this session met up with the rest of the Kiwi delegation for some beers on the terrace of the IBM house, then supported Shane and ASB at the Innovation awards, which were kinda weird but great fun. No gong for ASB but was so proud to see them up there!

 

 

StopPress Article | March 2017

StopPress Article | March 2017

This Article was originally published on StopPress NZ

The two key nascent technologies being showcased at SXSW 17 in Austin Texas, are undoubtedly AR/VR and AI cognitive learning, the latter of which essentially involves talking to computers through conversational search, chatbots and natural language processing.

AR and VR are, of course, fascinating, though still feel a little gimmicky, but AI has the possibility to not only fully disrupt the marketing world over the next few years, but to fundamentally shift the way we interact not just with machines but with people.

Over the last few days, I have seen technologies and services from IBM, Google, Amazon, Facebook, Dell, and heard from companies either just starting their journey or well into AI, chatbots, personal assistants, and machine learning that either make you very concerned or very excited about the future, depending on your perspective. We heard about a fashion retailer who last year allowed an AI to design a number of skirts and tops based on current trends and styles, and a recipe website that has built an AI to take lots of recipes for the same thing (say chocolate chip cookies) and try and develop a super recipe based on all the attributes of the recipes on site.

Take a very simple task for a human: “I’d like to get a bottle of wine that goes with pasta, on the way to Charles’ house”. For your human brain it’s easy to process. You can instantly picture the route to your friend’s house, recall where the bottle shop is, allocate a suitable budget, and decide which wine (red or white at least) goes with the pasta dish you are taking. But if you were to ask an AI the same question then the data sets the computer would have to know are staggering. At the very least it would need to know:

  • Your address
  • Charles’ address
  • The route to Charles’ house, and the closest bottle shop to that route
  • Your normal budget for a bottle of wine
  • What wines go with pasta, and in fact what type of pasta dish you are making
  • The inventory of the store closest to your route

That is a lot of information – address books, bank data, maps, wine database, food database, wine matching API, store inventory, etc. It’s especially complex because unlike search as it stands today that gives you a number of options based on keywords that you search for (in this case something like ‘bottle shops near me’),  in audio search you only want one response. The right answer. But this is exactly what companies like Google, Apple and Amazon are trying to achieve, through natural language processing and cognitive computing.

At the moment, the solution for AI to be able to understand what you need is through conversational search. Basically, the computer asks you questions that makes answering your main question easier, because—and this is really important—you only want one answer; not a list of choices. So, in this case, your AI Personal Assistant, may respond with, “what is Charles’ address? Which pasta dish have you made? What is your budget? Are you happy with Glengarry on New North Road?” And like any AI worth its salt, it will remember every answer you give, so that over time it will make it smarter and smarter.

I went to a talk that included one of the leads on “conversational search” from Bing and his advice was, plan now, as it will be the single biggest shift in consumer marketing behaviour, since search itself. This is because the web as it stands today has been indexed and is searched through keywords and phrases, sifting through search results until you get what you are looking for. With AI, keywords become redundant in many respect and through conversational search the focus shifts from keywords to intent. Search engines, like Google and Bing, are monetised through brands buying keywords and then serving an ad to a consumer along with other topically relevant ads.  So, what happens if rather than having multiple results, you only want one; how would that be decided, what is the role of SEO, versus SEM? In the example above, in which we’re looking for a bottle of wine you wouldn’t want a wine brand to be able to bid on your question and get their brand of wine recommended over others simply because they paid for it.

So what’s the advice from SXSW? Ignorance is not a strategy; start thinking now about what tasks an AI, be it a chatbot or something more elaborate. Could take over and start building a case? Happy to point you in the direction of some of the vendors I’ve met here. And remember that the sooner you get started the sooner your AI will start learning.

In the world of search, now really is the time to start thinking about voice search and conversational search. Discuss with your SEO team a 12-month roadmap to be ready. Alexa, Google Home, Cortana, and Siri are here, and they are only going to get smarter. You don’t want to be left behind.

For example, how powerful would it be for a consumer to ask Alexa on a Saturday morning “what’s the best deal on Samsung TVs in New Zealand at the moment?” and immediately the response comes back: “Noel Leeming has 50 percent off all Samsung TVs this weekend. The St Luke’s store, which is closest to you opens at 9am. Would you like me to send directions to your phone…”

SXSW Day 4 | March 13 2017

SXSW Day 4 | March 13 2017

Day 4. Getting into the rhythm of things now – understand the way this place works. Kind of. Maybe!

First session today was a talk from the Head of Research at Facebook IQ. Really interesting talk with lots of great insights but very fact heavy session so going to bullet point the main facts…

  • Facebook looks at audiences rather than demographics – in 2017 demographics are no longer relevant
    • For example 56% of parents (of all ages, social status, and geographical location) will have visited Facebook at least once by 7am. Parents actually start going online at 4am
  • 76% of adults say their mobile phone helps them have less inactive time
  • Conversions on mobile devices increase x2 when people are on the go
  • Perception of time is shorter on mobile – 33% shorter than desktop – time seems to go faster!
    • means you need to ensure speed is fast!
    • consumers scroll quicker on mobile than desktop
    • 40% of consumer leave a m-site if it takes longer than 3 secs to load
    • On travel sites people spend 75% less time making a booking on an m-site than on a desktop
  • mobile is all about shortcuts – making life easier
    • faster to purchase
    • faster to compare
  • consumers are 52% more likely to shop with a business they can message

After the Facebook talk I headed over to see Gareth Edward’s keynote speech. Gareth is most famous for directing the most recent Star Wars: Rogue One movie, but also directed Godzilla and one of my favourite films of all time; Monsters. His keynote was a real masterclass, with amazing anecdotes and one of the best sign off stories of all time. It’s an hour long but have a watch, I promise you’ll enjoy!

 

After Gareth Edwards, headed off to Best Buy with Kevin Malloy, to do some research for a number of clients – the amount of technology available is just so much better than in NZ! Bought an Amazon Echo for the office!

Then decided to go see some of the exhibitors. Firstly popped into the Capitol One House to see what they are doing with eno, their chatbot (one of the first banks in the world to do so). They are taking this very seriously and have even hired an ex-Pixar programmer to give Eno a real personality.

capital-one-eno.png

After Capital One spent some time at the You Tube house (more on this tomorrow) and then finally Panasonic House which was really weird! Lots of experimental technology like a laundry folding robot, a washing machine that uses air, a device that you can put any food into and it works out the calories, and a sleep app that works with your heating, lights, windows, etc to make your night better.

With it being 6pm decided to fit one more talk on which was the cast and writers of Veep which was really good fun – lots of anti-Trump chat!

 

 

SXSW Day 3 | March 12 2017

SXSW Day 3 | March 12 2017

Okay, so I’m not going to lie to you, today I felt a little rough. They put a lot of Tequila in Texas Margaritas!

But today was jam packed with some fantastic sessions, so pushed on, had some waffles (with bacon and brown sugar butter and maple syrup) and got on with it.

The first session was the one I was really looking forward to the most – “AI Replaces Search; the future of customer acquisition” or in other words how will AI change the way we find and discover stuff.

If you think about it search has only been around for a few years, but imagine a world without Google or Bing. But search is ripe for disruption. Ultimately the idea of conversational search , voice search, predicted search, and the like have been around for a while but right now there is a convergence of technology that could see the rapid rise in voice search over the next two to three years. The panel was world class including the CEO of Ozlo, that has developed natural language algorthims to power Alexa (Amaon’s AI). We also had Amanda from Hoteltonight.com and Brian from Yummly.com, both of which are experimenting with machine learning, chatbots and the like. Finally we had the lead scientist on AI from Bing. And these guys are taking this stuff really seriously.

The main takeaway from this talk is that marketers have to get much more focused when it comes to disruption. The reality is that millions of people are interacting with personal assistants like Siri, Cortana, Alexa, and Google (yep, Google called their AI, well Google!) every day and they are getting smarter but brands need to catch up and have to start thinking about structuring data and content in a way that is optimised not only for SEO, app discovery but not bot discovery. Soon, the reality of not being found by Alexa will be have as dramatic effect on a brand’s bottom line of not being in the top 3 organic search results. Take this stuff seriously people!

Take a very simple task for a human. “I’d like to get a bottle of wine that goes with pasta, on the way to Charles’ house”. Easy; you can in an instant picture the route to your friend’s house, recall where the bottle shop is, you know your budget, and you probably know (red or white at least) what wine goes with the pasta dish you are taking. But if you were to ask an AI the same question then the data sets the computer would have to know are staggering. At the very least it would need to know:

  • Your address
  • Charles’ address
  • The route to Charles house, and the closest bottle shop to that route
  • Your normal budget for a bottle of wine
  • What wines go with pasta, and in fact what type of pasta dish you are making
  • the inventory of the store closest to your route

That is a lot of information – address books, bank data, maps, wine database, food database, wine matching api, store inventory, etc. Its especially complex because unlike search as it stands today that gives you a number of options based on keywords that you search for (in this case something like “bottle shops near me”),  in audio search you only want one response. The right answer! But this is exactly what companies like Google, Apple, Amazon, etc. are trying to achieve, through natural language processing and cognitive computing.

At the moment the solution for AI to be able to understand what you need is through conversational search. Basically, the computer asks you questions that makes answering your main question easier, because, and  this is really important – when dealing with voice search – you only want one answer – not a list of choices. So in this case your AI Personal Assistant, may respond with, ” what is Charles’ address?, which pasta dish have you made?, what is your budget? are you happy with Glengarry on New North Road?” And like any AI worth its salt, it will remember every answer you give that over time will make it smarter and smarter.

The guy from Bing noted that it will be the single biggest shift in consumer marketing behaviour, since search itself. This is because the web as it stands today has been indexed and is searched through keywords and phrases, sifting through search results until you get what you are looking for. With AI, keywords become redundant in many respect and through conversational search the focus shifts from keywords to intent. Search Engines like Google and Bing are monetised through brands buying keywords and then serving an ad to a consumer along with other topically relevant ads.  So, what happens if rather that having multiple results, you only want one; how would that be decided, what is the role of seo, versus sem? In the example above, in which we’re looking for a bottle of wine you wouldn’t want a wine brand to be able to bid on your question and get their brand of wine recommended over others simply because they paid for it.

So what’s the advice from SXSW? Ignorance is not a strategy; start thinking now about what tasks an AI, be it a chatbot or something more elaborate, could take over and start building a case. Happy to point you in the direction of some of the vendors I’ve met here. And remember that the sooner you get started the sooner your AI will start learning.

In the world of search, now really is the time to start thinking about voice search and conversational search. Discuss with your SEO team a 12 month roadmap to be ready. Alexa, Google Home, Cortana, and Siri are here, and they are only going to get smarter. You don’t want to be left behind.

For example how powerful would it be for a consumer to ask Alexa on a Saturday morning “what’s the best deal on Samsung TVs in New Zealand at the moment”, and immediately the response come back; “Noel Leeming has 50% off all Samsung TVs this weekend. The St Lukes store which is closest to you, opens at 9am. Would you like me to send directions to your phone…” There’s even a company that I met with called Spoken Layer who optimizes your content for Alexa and Google Home!

I’ve written more than enough today, and to be honest after helping Shane Evans out for half an hour at the ASB Clever Kash stand and then having a few beers with Shane, and my old boss Kevin Malloy which was a really great catch up, I caught up with some work and then crashed out!

 

 

SXSW Day 2 | March 11 2017

SXSW Day 2 | March 11 2017

Today was an insane day.

Today wasn’t really about learning new stuff, but more about everything you knew was probably right being confirmed by someone with a PhD. Like common sense on steroids!

First session was a panel discussing cognitive science in advertising, behavioral science and something called consumer neuroscience! One for Jacs Bennett for sure! Basically people studying the human brain to understand the effectiveness of advertising. They do this as ultimately focus groups are scientifically useless as the responses are driven by emotions rather than cognitive thought.

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The first speaker talked about how unified creative across all platforms enhanced memory, and recall, and therefore brand preference. Basically, if you want to sell more stuff ensure all your ads look, feel and sound the same across all channels and devices. The other big revelation is that by watching people watch TV in natural settings, they have discovered that people watch TV with their head down (mostly on a device, occasionally asleep!)  65% of the time, and only 35% actually looking at the screen. And here’s the common sense on steroids bit – your eyes might be diverted from the screen, but your ears are always on, so if you want impact (or indeed if you want people to even watch your ad) think about the sound on your ads – start with a bang, or just think about how to raise attention. Genius. Obvious, but genius.

The panel also discussed what a bad job we are, and publishers especially are doing in digital. And I couldn’t agree more. Ad blocking is an issue we need to tackle head on – we’re seeing a 50% global growth in adoption but publishers are still creating pop ups, interstitial ads, etc which the consumers hate! We know this, publishers know this, brands know this, but publishers are still selling them despite knowing that they are a terrible consumer experience.

Another interesting stat that was discussed was that by using TV creative on a mobile device reduces effectiveness by over 50%.

In a nutshell, and I hasten to add that I’ve been banging this drum for years; optimize your creative for channel and device, as if you don’t you are quite literally wasting your money!

The second speaker had spent the last three years looking at the science of video virality. He basically was looking to be able to scientifically predict if your video had the ability to go viral. He talked about the Budweiser “Born the Hard Way” ad that got 21.1 million video views in less than 24 hours.

So they took the video into the lab, and with a series of tests including facial coding (measuring expressions when watching the ad), eye tracking, body language, and brain function they could measure the emotional impact of the ad. Amazing stuff, and important to say they don’t have a secret recipe on what makes a video viral but if one of their clients has an ad that they think is amazing, they’ll test to measure the true emotional impact. Really cool stuff!

The final speaker was another neuroscientist who studies the emotional impact advertising has on our brains. He showed two Birds Eye ads, one for peas, one for fish, and went through the incredible process that helped determine for the client why one was incredibly successful and one was a flop. They were able to identify the exact moment that lost the audience, help re-cut that scene and get it back out to market.

One other fact that came out of this session was that in all their research the most effective combination to drive emotional response, is by releasing an ad on Facebook first, quickly followed by TV.

The second talk of the day was on the growing importance of messaging apps. In this session the world of emojis, branded keyboards, native distribution and conversational UI were discussed. The panel consisted of the CDO of Mindshare, Head of Marketing for Dunkin Donuts, and the Head of Marketing from Nike. Yep, pretty impressive!

This session was really a eureka moment – and a space we need to understand quickly. They discussed that although in the West, messaging for brands is still a fledgling industry but in Asia it is massive – you can rent a car using we-chat, buy a pizza using Facebook messenger, check your bank balance using iMessage and much more. The most interesting thing for me was the fact that messaging was blurring the lines between commerce, customer service and brand experience and for that reason if brands want to get into the messaging space then they need to get it right. And the penalty for getting it wrong will be massive.

I went to a a third session on behavioral impact n consumers of cookies, which sounded interesting, but was in fact really dull. Nothing new here folks, except for the fact that one of the researchers had developed an algorithm that could better diagnose the likely hood of a woman getting post-partum depression through the tweets a pregnant woman sent than a doctor.

The last talk of the day was from a guy called Casey Neistat who went from a You Tube star to one of the most powerful media people in the US. Below is the video he is most famous for – basically Nike gave him a bunch of cash (like ten years ago) and he shot the below. 25m vies on YouTube!

The coolest thing about his talk was his philosophy on life which is what he calls the “Tarzan Method” which is basically, grab a vine, see where it takes you, and get on with it!

This post is getting rather long, so to wrap things up, after the keynote I met Tom Bates for a few beers, went to a fantastic dinner with Optimizely, where I met some fascinating people including a girl who designs toilet paper for Kimberley Clark for a living. After that I met up with a bunch of people at the Pandora House where Gucci Mane was playing.

Thanks to James Butcher from Pandora NZ I was on the VIP list and avoided the hour queue in the rain! Thanks! Gucci Mane was amazing! Then on to a party at 90 Seconds, and then finally got to bed at 12. But not before bumping into literally my favorite American Author ever, Po Bronson in the lift of my hotel. I’ve honestly never been so star stuck!

SXSW Day 1 | March 10 2017

SXSW Day 1 | March 10 2017

Okay. So first, I’ve got to say that I now get the hype. This place is incredible, inspirational, frustrating, invigorating, and very tiring.

After two days of no vegetables, breakfast today was granola and fruit, which was definitely a good choice. After wandering around the city (the conference is spread over the city across tens of official venues and literally hundreds of unofficial venues) Ben and I decided on before getting stuck into the conference we went to check out the lines and some of the key exhibitor sponsors stands, both of which were very big!

As my first session didn’t start until 11am I decided to have a look round the immediate vicinity of the Convention Center. Everywhere you look are household names such as Dell, IBM, Twitter, HBO, etc. taking over entire buildings for the eight days of SXSW. The most impressive from the outside was the IBM building. They had taken over an entire restaurant for a month, and transformed it into an interactive showcase of their Watson technology, which for those unfamiliar with Watson is an IBM supercomputer that combines artificial intelligence (AI) and sophisticated analytical software as a “question answering” machine.

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I’d heard of Watson and Cognitive computing (the simulation of human thought processes in a computerized model) but never seen such a myriad uses. Again those not in the know Cognitive computing involves self-learning systems that use data mining, pattern recognition and natural language processing to mimic the way the human brain works.

Pretty cool stuff! In the IBM house they had numerous real life uses of Watson (including advertising – more on that soon) but the one that really brought it to life was when we built our own robot (TJBot) which allows you to connect to Watson in a simple and fun way. This tiny robot, built out of cardboard and powered by a Raspberry Pi computer has on board a camera, mic, speaker, wi-fi and you are able to talk to it, interact with it, but also connects to Watson services so for example you can tell it to take a photo of the room, and then uses the Watson supercomputer to work out what is in the room. I have one to bring back to the office so everyone can have a play!

We then wandered around some of the other exhibits – we saw a company called Carvana that has built a vending machine for cars. I kid you not. We also wandered by the American Gods area (new series coming soon from the genius book). They’d built a massive (20m high) buffalo with smoke coming out of its eyes. Again, I kid you not.

So, on to my fist proper session which was ” Beyond Fintech: Blockchain for Every Industry”. Again for the uninitiated a block chain is “a distributed database that maintains a continuously growing list of data records that are hardened against tampering and revision, even by operators of the data store’s nodes. The most widely known application of a block chain is the public ledger of transactions for cryptocurrencies, such as bitcoin” What relevance to digital media does this have, I hear you ask. Well, one of the most asked questions we get from clients is “how do you secure our data”. I wanted to look into ways that we could ensure that the data we use and store for our clients is being secured in a way that both us and our clients are under no illusion that it could be tampered with, changed or stolen. What this will give us is a humanized internet that ensures safety. With some of the world’s experts in block-chain on the panel it is plain to see that every industry from health, tech, finance, entertainment is looking at real life use cases for block chain, including advertising. More on this later…

So this was where SXSW is tiring and frustrating. After this session, it was a 20 minute walk to the nest session, which I really wanted to see which was about the future of the personalized web. The session started at 12:30, I got there at 12, but it had been full for an hour. Bugger.

So another 20 minute walk back o the Convention center for the Keynote, by a guy called Cory Richards. This was awesome. Inspirational, a little sad, quite funny, but also very relevant. In a nutshell Cory Richards after a difficult childhood took up mountain climbing, but then after nearly dying in an avalanche suffered PTSD which pushed him to drink and drugs but also doing riskier and riskier feats of endurance. He is most famous for being a world class photographer for National Geographic as well as documenting one of the very few ascents of Everest with no oxygen through snapchat and instagram.

He talked of the importance of authenticity and the fact that although people admire the beautiful photos he takes they engage and care more about the real images and videos shared through snachat and instagram. For me it really hammered home the fact that people using social media do what to engage with people and brands that are being authentic, and honest so when they see posts and updates from brands that are overly thought through and “optimized” it is easy to see through when compared to the real posts of their friends and the people they choose to follow…

More wandering around after the keynote. Popped my head into the SEO Meet-up, the Bots Meet up and the ANZ meet up which were quite cool, and made lots of contacts. Then wandered around the Dell house (very average) and then just when I considered calling it a day we stumbled upon a the “THE MUMMY Zero Gravity VR Experience”. This was super-cool and quite possibly the future of movie going. Briefly, IMAX had a shot a small part of the new Mummy franchise, now with Tom Cruise, with a 360 VR camera, so (after a 40 minute wait) we sat in these zero gravity pods (that moved with the angle of the camera), put on VR goggles and headphones to watch this scene and a short documentary on how they did it. It was amazing!! The most immersive cinema experience ever – full 360 views, 3D, and moving. Loved it!!

What a day! Got back to the hotel around 6pm shattered but very happy, and considerably more informed that when I woke up.

Highlight:  IBM Watson

Low Point: Missing out because of the queues!

More tomorrow!